Archive for September 26th, 2014

 

Warming caused by the winds, not humans?

The L.A. Times, an excepted left leaning publication and considered a good soldier to the left run the attached article …

More evidence from the lefts own Koolaid drinkers that Mother Earth is going to do her own thing.

West Coast warming linked to naturally occurring changes

This article appeared on the 23rd – tony.barboza@latimes.com

Twitter: @tonybarboza

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times

Naturally occurring changes in winds, not human-caused climate change, are responsible for most of the warming on land and in the sea along the West Coast of North America over the last century, a study has found.

The analysis challenges assumptions that the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has been a significant driver of the increase in temperatures observed over many decades in the ocean and along the coastline from Alaska to California.

The Klamath River and the Pacific Ocean
A recent study finds that weakening winds accounted for more than 80% of the warming trend along the Pacific Northwest coast between Washington and Northern California. Above, the Klamath River flows into the Pacific about 50 miles from the California-Oregon border. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)
Changes in ocean circulation as a result of weaker winds were the main cause of about 1 degree Fahrenheit of warming in the northeast Pacific Ocean and nearby coastal land between 1900 and 2012, according to the analysis of ocean and air temperatures over that time. The study, conducted by researchers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Washington, was published Monday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Natural, wind-driven climate patterns in the Pacific Ocean, such as El Niño and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, are already known to exert a powerful influence on sea and land temperatures over years and even decades.

This latest research shows that similar changes in atmospheric and ocean circulation can drive trends that last a century or longer, overshadowing the effects of human-generated increase in greenhouse gases, the study’s authors said.

This does not call into question the concept of global warming.
– Kevin Trenberth, National Center for Atmospheric Research
“Changing winds appear to explain a very large fraction of the warming from year to year, decade to decade and the long-term,” said study leader James Johnstone, an independent climatologist who did most of the work when he was at the University of Washington’s Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean.

When coastal wind speeds weaken, they result in less evaporation from the sea surface and unusually low pressure that alters ocean currents and causes temperatures to rise over time.

The study found that weakening winds accounted for more than 80% of the warming trend along the Pacific Northwest coast between Washington and Northern California. In Southern California, weaker winds were responsible for about 60% of the increased warming.

cComments
I have to give some credit to the LA Times for this article. Seeing both sides of the argument helps find the truth, and the truth is we still do not understand the mechanisms why the planet heats and cools. I would rather we call this Climate Study, since our human impact is not even a blink…
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AT 11:55 AM SEPTEMBER 23, 2014
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If global warming had been the most powerful influence on land and sea temperatures, those temperatures would have been different, the study’s authors said. Most of the warming in the region occurred before 1940, when greenhouse gas concentrations were lower and winds were weaker, the study found. In contrast, winds have strengthened since 1980 and coastal ocean cooled, even as the rise in greenhouse gases has accelerated.

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Evan Halper
The study focused only on trends at the regional level and did not offer conclusions about the influence of naturally occurring winds on warming throughout the world. If anything, the results reinforce what scientists have known for years: that global climate projections fall short in predicting how temperatures are actually changing at the regional scale.

Kevin Trenberth, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., who was not involved in the study, said its conclusions about long-term trends were probably overstated because the quality of data from the early 20th century was poor and unreliable. The results may also reflect the fact that the northeast Pacific is an area of the globe where past studies have shown the “signal” of climate change is low relative to the “noise” of natural variability.

“There is no doubt that regionally, the changes in temperature are dominated by changes in the atmospheric circulation that likely have little or nothing to do with climate change,” Trenberth said. But, he added, “this does not call into question the concept of global warming.”

 
 
 

POTUS addresses UN: Obama calls on nations to confront extremists

UNITED NATIONS — The world is making progress on items ranging from human rights to global warming, President Obama said Wednesday, but all of that could be undone by the largest threat: extremist violence.

In his annual address to the United Nations, Obama urged all countries and religions — especially Islam — to reject the extremist ideologies that fuel bloodshed and threaten global stability.

“As we look to the future, one issue risks a cycle of conflict that could derail so much progress,” Obama said. “And that is the cancer of violent extremism that has ravaged so many parts of the Muslim world.”

The president’s annual visit to the United Nations came the same week the United States began airstrikes in Syria against the Islamic State, one of the extremist groups cited by Obama. Attacks continued Wednesday. Last month, the president authorized similar strikes against the militant group in Iraq.

AP_UN_General_Assembly_Obama
President Obama speaks during the 69th session of the U.N. General Assembly in New York on Sept. 24.(Photo: Seth Wenig, AP)

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The escalation prompted some critics to question whether the United States is the right country to address the problems of global violence.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, speaking on CBS’ This Morning, protested the attacks in Syria, saying, “No terrorist group can be eradicated and destroyed through aerial bombardments.”

The threats of extremism dominated Obama’s crowded schedule Wednesday, the second of three days of U.N. meetings. It included an Obama meeting with the new prime minister of Iraq and a special U.N. Security Council session devoted to the problem of “foreign fighters.”

The council passed a resolution requiring countries to crack down on the recruitment of fighters who could move to other nations to launch attacks. That includes efforts to shut off financing for terrorist groups. To that end, Obama’s Treasury and State Departments announced sanctions on 24 groups and individuals they say have aided the movement of foreign fighters.

Intelligence agencies estimate that more than 15,000 foreign fighters from 80 countries have traveled to training bases in Syria in recent years, Obama told the Security Council.

Addressing the U.N. General Assembly, Obama defended the Syria and Iraq airstrikes that have targeted the al-Qaeda-affiliated Khorasan group, as well as Islamic State positions.

Citing the Islamic State’s record of violence, which includes beheadings of hostages, Obama told the delegates, “The only language understood by killers like this is the language of force.”

Obama used the words “fanaticism,” “hate” and “evil” to describe the Islamic State, condemning it as a “network of death.”

President Obama labels the Islamic State extremist group a “brand of evil” in an address to the United Nations General Assembly. “There can be no reasoning – no negotiation – with this brand of evil. The only language understood by killers like this is the language of force. So the United States of America will work with a broad coalition to dismantle this network of death.”President Obama labels the Islamic State extremist group a “brand of evil” in an address to the United Nations General Assembly. “There can be no reasoning – no negotiation – with this brand of evil. The only language understood by killers like this is the language of force. So the United States of America will work with a broad coalition to dismantle this network of death.” (Photo: Spencer Platt, Getty Images)
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President Obama labels the Islamic State extremist group a “brand of evil” in an address to the United Nations General Assembly. “There can be no reasoning – no negotiation – with this brand of evil. The only language understood by killers like this is the language of force. So the United States of America will work with a broad coalition to dismantle this network of death.” In 2013, President Obama references mass shootings as “acts of evil” while discussing gun-control proposals. “While there is no law or set of laws that can prevent every senseless act of violence completely, no piece of legislation that will prevent every tragedy, every act of evil, if there’s even one thing we can do to reduce this violence, if there’s even one life that can be saved, then we’ve got an obligation to try it.” In 2002, President George W. Bush refers to Iran, North Korea, and Iraq as an “axis of evil” in his State of the Union Address. “States like these, and their terrorist allies, constitute an axis of evil, arming to threaten the peace of the world.”

In 2001, President George W. Bush calls the 9/11 terrorist attacks “evil, despicable acts of terror.” “Thousands of lives were suddenly ended by evil, despicable acts of terror. … Today our nation saw evil, the very worst of human nature.”

In 1983, President Reagan labels the Soviet Union an “empire of evil” in an address to the National Association of Evangelicals. “So, in your discussions of the nuclear freeze proposals, I urge you to beware the temptation of pride – the temptation of blithely declaring yourselves above it all – and label both sides equally at fault, to ignore the facts of history and the aggressive impulses of an evil empire, to simply call the arms race a giant misunderstanding and thereby remove yourself from the struggle between right and wrong and good and evil.” In 1860, President Abraham Lincoln calls slavery “evil” in his Cooper Union Address: “This is all Republicans ask – all Republicans desire – in relation to slavery: as those fathers marked it, so let it again be marked, as an evil, not to be extended, but to be tolerated and protected only because of and so far as its actual presence among us makes that toleration and protection a necessity.”
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The United States has assembled “a broad coalition” to defeat the militants, including Arab states, Obama said. He cited plans to train forces in Iraq and Syria to carry the fight on the ground against the Islamic State and other jihadists. He said, “We will neither tolerate terrorist safe havens, nor act as an occupying power.”

In calling on Muslims to denounce extremist ideology, Obama said a lethal group of terrorists “have perverted one of the world’s great religions.”

Thomas McDonnell, a professor of international law at Pace Law School in White Plains, N.Y., said it’s commendable for Obama to speak out against global extremism. The challenge, he said, is that many people around the world see the United States as a longtime backer of repressive regimes, especially in the Middle East.

“We are not exactly a neutral arbiter,” McDonnell said. “It’s a complicated situation.”

Obama’s speech was in sharp contrast to his U.N. address last year. Then, he spoke of ending “a decade of war” that included Iraq and Afghanistan and having the United States shift away “from a perpetual war footing.”

Citing criticism of the United States, Obama acknowledged the nation’s faults, specifically last month’s fatal shooting by police in Ferguson, Mo.

Though “we have our own racial and ethnic tensions,” Obama said, the United States has “worked to address our problems, to make our union more perfect.”

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Noting hopeful signs around the world, Obama said the prospects of major wars between global powers are reduced, poverty rates are falling and the Internet is helping to educate millions.

But Obama also spoke of a “pervasive unease in our world” about events such as the Ebola epidemic in West Africa and Russian aggression in Ukraine — and terrorism.

“We come together at a crossroads,” he said. “Between war and peace, between disorder and integration, between fear and hope.”